Asymmetric spinnaker
code 0for cruising sailboats

asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
asymmetric spinnaker
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Characteristics

Type
asymmetric spinnaker, code 0
Applications
for cruising sailboats

Description

The Code Zero is a cross between a genoa and an asymmetrical spinnaker that is used for sailing close to the wind in light air. Code Zero was initially an attempt to circumvent a rating rule by making a large genoa for close reaching on boats that were measured with non-overlapping genaos. The Code Zero got around the rule by measuring in as a very narrow-flat spinnaker with shape similar to a reaching geona. When not constrained by rating rules, cruising sailors have a lot more options on the size and shape of a "code" sail. UK Sailmakers offers two different Cruising Code sails depending on whether your boat has an overlapping genoa or a non-overlapping genoa. Many modern cruising boats come with large mainsails and non-overlapping jibs because that sail-plan is easier for couples to handle. The Code Zero for these boats can be used as soon as the the boat bears off from a beat. The sail is very flat and is designed for close reaching. It has a nearly straight luff, a mid girth about 60-65% of the sail's foot length. This sail is closer in shape to a traditional drifter than a spinnaker. Even though this sail is smaller than a Code Zero on a race boat, it is more than twice the size of the non-overlapping jib and gives much more power for close reaching. With a straight luff, the sail rolls up very well. The Berckemeyer 45 shown above has this type of Code Zero.

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*Prices are pre-tax. They exclude delivery charges and customs duties and do not include additional charges for installation or activation options. Prices are indicative only and may vary by country, with changes to the cost of raw materials and exchange rates.