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Inboard express cruiser Scarlett Macaw 33

inboard express cruiser
inboard express cruiser
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Characteristics

Motor type
inboard
Length

10 m (32'09")

Description

It is frequently asked of me fairly how a new boat design comes to life and what were the steps involved in the evolution of each design and the answer is never a simple one. The “Onamuni” project came up originally as an email inquiry from a Mr. Al Hatfield. Al was looking for a launch to service his lodge on Lake Vermillion in Northern Minnesota. The boat would be used to run his friends and family the 26 odd miles up lake to the nearest watering hole and back again. Lake Vermillion is a fairly large lake with lots of islands and hundreds of miles of waterfront, all of it interesting and sight worthy, but Al had it in his mind that the trip would be even more enjoyable if it were done with a ‘really classy launch’ as the hub of the whole experience. So Al’s simple question of “Do I have a launch in my quiver of designs and what would I recommend?” morphed after a couple of weeks to the early preliminary drawing of the Onamuni. We called that early design the “Scarlett Macaw” but soon after the building project commenced, the name morphed into the “Onamuni” which is the Indian name for Lake Vermillion. Al had strong ideas of what he wanted and one day he made a statement. He said “Sam, some people have Ferraris as one of their cars and barely drive them. I have a Ferrari and I drive mine everyday.” He was trying to tell me that performance was really important and that he intended to extract as much performance as he could on a daily basis while using the new boat. I probably muttered something about why build a boat that can go 40 miles per hour and then run around at 15 mph every day babying the engines.
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